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Rhino
27-06-2006, 11:06 PM
Since it started raining, all the inline 6s and 1.8l cars have been cuttin sick and doing 'wheelies' and burnouts.

How have these engineering geniuses managed to harness the power of water and turn it into an extreme performance increase?

Are we able to adapt it to bikes?

likefry
27-06-2006, 11:34 PM
Yeah you do get more power from a little water in the air but only like 5% water.
What happens is the water cools the air a little hence condensing it.
it also cools the burn down a bit so its slower. so the flame front propagation is slower and expands more evenly with the downwards movement of the cylinder so a more even pressure the whole downwards stroke instead of a big pressure increase right at the start.
Oh and the water also get converted to steam creating more gas.
Plus it cools the whole engine down.

I think thats how it works anyway

Jonchilds
27-06-2006, 11:55 PM
Water in the air, without changing the air temperature, would reduce the carnot efficiency of an engine, as the fuel/air charge is unable to heat up as much during combustion. This lowers cylinder pressures, and actually means that your engine is running a little less efficiently.

Even the 1.6L pulsar I'm driving at the moment (with 493,000km on the clock) is cutting loose with a little bit more clutch. Strangely, the brakes do the same when water is around, since coefficient of friction for wet roads is much lower than dry ones.

If you inject water into a hot, compressed cylinder, still containing it's charge, then you can extract useful work, as has been seem with the '6-stroke' engine, where burnt exhaust gases are recompressed, and distilled water injected to convert the heat into mechanical work.

Sean'o
28-06-2006, 12:56 AM
Its a little know phenomenom known as WRMMCGF (wet roads make my car go faster) what happens is this.
When the road becomes wet, a reaction takes place between the road surface and the rubber in the tire, this sets off a chemical imbalance which excites the electrons in the tyre. They then run really fast along the drive shaft, through the gear box into the engine making the engine turn faster thus making more HP and making the wheels spin. But they dont stop at the engine! no no no, they then head off up through the carby, along the throttle cable, through the acelerator into the drivers foot, up his body and into his brain, giving him a feeling of pure exileration, thus he puts his foot harder on the acelerator because he wants to maximise the intense feeling he is getting, this in turn spins the wheels faster, coming into contact with more water, exciting more electrons and the whole process repeats until driver A. crashes or B. hits a dry spot in the road. The feeling of excitement can apparently be greatly enhanced by wearing a beanie and flannel shirt! This technology works best on low powered cars or ones with different coloured body panels. Oh and SS utes as well.
This technology can be applied to motorcycles but it has been scientifically proven that the majority of motorcyclists are not stupid enuff to try and harness this extra HP as they have more than enough Hp already ;)

chief wiggum
28-06-2006, 08:07 AM
thanks for that sean'o, i always wandered how that worked. now, where's my beany and flanno? :)

Rhino
28-06-2006, 08:14 AM
Seano - Thanks for playing!

Glad someone saw where I was going...

dolph
28-06-2006, 08:32 AM
likefry....jonchilds...

U 2 need to get out more.... :geek:

EMVY
28-06-2006, 09:08 AM
Not only does it excite electrons, it has another effect too..

I can vouch for this as I see it all the time outside my shop.

The excited electrons also create an imbalance in the molecular structure in the metal of the vehicle effectively ionising the particles and making the car magnetic. Now cars always magnetise north at the front and south at the rear. This creates even more power as the vehicle is drawn to the one in front of it. This effect is dictated by the amount of excited electrons that have traveled to the drivers brain. The more electrons, the stronger the effect. Inevitabaly, the positively charged bumper of the rear car comes in contact with the negatively charged bumper of the rear car. It is very difficult to counter this massive magnetically generated HP increase judging by the amount of tow trucks I see in wet weather

sathid
28-06-2006, 09:22 AM
darwin's universal law of conservation of species:

Wetness = people getting excited.

In an ideal world the two most common forms of this phenomenon, would cancel each other out to keep populations constant.

Pkunk
28-06-2006, 10:40 AM
....and you wonder why insuring a commadore for an under 25's male is expensive.

At every other set of lights i see a commadore bagging it up in the wet, sliding out... and nearly coming to grief :P

seandre
28-06-2006, 12:03 PM
Wet roads and young drivers keep me employed :D

EMVY
28-06-2006, 12:13 PM
Wet roads and young drivers keep me employed :D
[/b]
Which means you either work at a Panelbeater or a Hospital? :blink:

Scoundrel
28-06-2006, 02:06 PM
....and you wonder why insuring a commadore for an under 25's male is expensive.

At every other set of lights i see a commadore bagging it up in the wet, sliding out... and nearly coming to grief :P
[/b]

Watersports :lol:

gytr_r1
28-06-2006, 02:52 PM
It works for bikes too... I recall doing 9,000 rpm in 4th, at 20kmh once... across an intersection... in the rain.

Last year I passed a car on the way to Cairns on the R1 on the highway, and on a 6th gear roll-on from 100, the supercharging effect of the rain snapped me sideways enough for the ute behind me to slam on the brakes... the hp increase effect is multiplied with white lines... Obviously my rwhp leapt from 160 to more than a motogp bike... it obviously increases hp dramatically. I mean you get so powerful even your front tyre slides...

rod
28-06-2006, 04:54 PM
It seems to get into the throttle cable/linkages too, making them work a lot better. I tell you, that stuff is liquid grunt. Clouds rulz0r!!!1