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Thread: New to Riding? Looking for a 250? A guide for n00bs..

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    New to Riding? Looking for a 250? A guide for n00bs..

    The question gets asked here oh so much. What 250 should I buy? How much should I spend? What about licencing? How much is insurance?... the answers are always the same. So... heres a bit of a guide to answer the most common questions and to give a little info on the most common 250's available. I hope this goes some way to helping you get amongst it. Lets not turn this into a shitfest over Hyondukaha now mmkay?

    I've seen all these different looking bikes. Which is best for me?

    Fully faired:

    Fully faired bikes are what most people tend to be familiar with as they offer styling close (loosely) to that of their larger super sport cousins. The screen and fairings tend to cover most of the functional parts of the bike such as your instruments and engine affording a clean look.


    Attributes:
    • Offers more protection from the wind at higher speeds than other styles of bike. You're still going to get blown around unless you're vertically challenged but it wont be quite as much as on a naked/cruiser and yes you're still going to get wet when it rains.
    • Hand grips are closer together than nakeds/cruisers.
    • You'll hear people say the seating position of fully faired bikes is more aggressive than the other styles. Essentially, your upper body is more forward than on nakeds/cruisers. More weight is tends to be on your wrists. Those who suffer lower back pain may find the seating position causes issues on longer runs. Ultimately though, most get use to the seating position fairly quickly and dint experience too many problems.
    • Handling closer to that of a super sports than a naked/cruiser.
    • There's more to break when you drop it. A simple stationary drop in the driveway could end up costing in the thousands if you bust your fairings.
    • As a result of the above, they're more expensive to ensure than nakeds/cruisers.
    • Easy to keep looking clean. A quick squirt with the hose and a rub down with a chamois is often enough.
    Naked:

    As the name implies, these bikes are (for want of a better term) naked. They let it all hang out for all to see. The instruments, the engine, the radiator the lot.


    Attributes:
    • Offers very little in the way of protection from the wind. Despite this, you don't really notice it until you start approaching speeds the wrong side of the freeway limit unless you're a lanky bugger.
    • Hand grips are usually further apart than on a fully faired bike which some find feels more natural.
    • The seating position on nakeds is quite upright which again, some find to be more Natal. This can be an advantage for those suffering lower back pain.
    • The handling of nakeds is a little different than that of a fully faired bike. Given the seating position and that the hand grips are further apart, you'll find the bike seems to turn a little easier. This also aids in low speed control.
    • Theres little to break when you drop it as theres no plastic hanging out around the engine etc. It doesn't mean you wont break anything, it's just less likely.
    • Insurance is cheaper as there's less to break.
    • A little harder to keep looking clean than a fully faired bike as theres lots of little nooks and crannies for muck to gather in.
    Cruiser:

    The lounge chair of the bike world. Most people think Harley Davidson when thinking cruisers but today, the Japanese and Korean manufacturers have many offerings at prices much more attractive than Harleys. (Pssst... they're also more reliable but dint tell the HD boys that mmkay ) Lots of chrome, saddle bags, wide fuel tanks etc.


    Attributes:
    • As with naked bikes, cruisers offer little in the way of wind protection.
    • Hand grips tend to be further apart than any other style of bike. Again, as with the nakeds, some may find this quite a natural.
    • Seating position on a cruiser is quite unique. With the other styles of bike mentioned, your feet are below and slightly behind you with your body forward or slightly forward depending on the bike. With a cruiser, your feet are usually out in front of you.
    • Handling on a cruiser is also quite unique. These are not corner carving street warriors so dint be surprised if you scrape your exhaust, boards, pegs etc trying to keep up with your mates on their nakeds/faired bikes. They are however quite comfy for longer 'cruisey' runs.
    • As with nakeds, theres little to break when you drop it.
    • Insurance tends to be on par with nakeds.
    • Cleaning the thing? Thats a whole different story. Theres lots of shiny things to polish which may seem like fun the first couple of times you do it but for most it wares thin pretty quickly.
    What about the type of engine?

    Modern bikes come with many different engine configurations. Single, V-Twin, Parallel Twin, Inline Tripple, Inline 4, V-4 etc... 250s though usually only come with one of the following. (please note the following is more of a general guide and by no means absolute)

    Single:
    Yep, thats it. One single solitarty cylinder. Just like your lawn mower.


    Attributes:
    • Strong and reliable. Almost bullet proof if they're built by one of the majour brands. (Pagsta is not a majour brand. Dont kid yourself)
    • Most of the power of a single is found in the lower end of the rev range. They tend to run out of steam a little in the top end. This has improved somewhat with modern engines though. (More Torque nm/ft.lbs. Less power hp/kw)
    • Very efficient.
    • Cheap to service and repair. Theres only one cylinder afterall.
    • Can vibrate a little on take off. You may feel the pulses of the engine as you're letting the clutch out on small throttle openings.
    V-Twin
    Two of em this time around but in a V configuration. The V varys in degrees from around 48 in most cruisers through to 90 as found in the more sports oriented designs with some oddballs like the 78degree twin found in the Hyosungs thrown in for good measure.


    Attributes:
    • Still very strong and reliable.
    • Power delivery shifts a little further up the rev range towards the middle. V-Twins still have ample bottom end but have more mid range than a single. Run out of puff a little up top but not as much as a single.(Still plenty of torque but a little more power)
    • Efficient
    • Cheap to service and repair but some things may cost a little more as theres two of em.
    • Can vibrate a little but usually nothing like a single. (We're talking about 250's here )
    Parallel Twin
    Two cylinders but this time side by side. Like a typical four cylinder engine cut in half. Bikes with these engines are often called sewing machines.


    Attributes:
    • Reliability on par with V-twin
    • Power delivery pretty much on par with V-twin with a slight shift further up the rev range again. Not quite as much torque as a V-twin, but doesnt run out of top end quite as quick.
    • Efficient
    • Service & repair on par wth V-Twin
    • Usually very smooth engines with little vibration.
    Inline 4.


    Four tiny little cylinders in a row. Just like a minature version of most car engines.
    • Reasonably reliable but due the stresses imposed on the internal components as a result of the high revs these engines use to obtain there power, they can fail earlier than the other engine types
    • Almost no bottom end and little mid range. These engines need to be made to scream (quite litterally) to develop real power. When they are making power, right up the top end of their rev range, they make lots of it.
    • Not as efficient as other offerings
    • Service and repair more expensive.
    • Very smooth.
    There are other engines out there... 2 strokes for instance. You know, like your whipper snipper or outboard? The smelly smokey ones? Yeah thats them. You either like them or hate them. They have a bit of a cult following around these parts. But a few key points for those interested.
    • Develop the most power for their capacity although the least amount of torque
    • Power delivery is sudden. There is usually no smooth transision between having no power and having lots. Not such a problem with the smaller engines (125,150) but for the 250's and up you need to be AWAKE to ride. If not, chances are you'll get bitten.
    • The least efficient option. A 250 2 stroke will drink more than a 1000 four stroke. AND its drinking oil too.
    • Reasonably cheap to fix even if things go completely pair shapped in side the engine as there are very few moving parts. You'll be servicing them more often than 4 strokes though.
    • Smooth when in power band but otherwise rough as guts.
    • The bikes's they're in are lighter and will out handle/out brake just about any 4 stroke bike.
    So... what bikes are out there?

    HONDA CBR250RR



    First Released: 1989

    Price when new: $9990.00 + ORC
    Second Hand Value: $3500-$6500 depending on age and condition.


    Specifications:
    • 249cc Liquid cooled DOHC 16 valve inline 4
    • Power: 40hp (23.kW) @ 14500 RPM
    • Torque: 23.5nm (17.35ft.lbs) @ 11500 RPM
    • Weight: 158kg (dry)
    • Transmission: 6speed
    • Fuel Capacity: 13l
    • Range: 180-250km typical
    • Colours: Take your pick.
    Other Points:
    • Most of these bikes were imported into Australia under the grey import system. As such, bikes that are 15 years old are often advertised as a 2000 model for instance which, if an import, was the year that bike gained Australian Compliance. They were sold here new for a short while. Also, if you're particularly looking for an RR, be mindful of the fact that some R's have been repainted and may have RR decals.
    • One of the most powerful 4 stroke 250s.
    • Expensive for what they are.

    HONDA VTR250


    First Released: 1999
    Price when new: $7990.00 + ORC
    Second Hand Value: $3500-$6500 depending on age and condition.


    Specifications:
    • 249cc Liquid cooled 8 valve 90deg V-Twin
    • Power: 32hp (23.86kw) @ 10500 RPM
    • Torque: 27.5nm (26.26ft.lbs) @ 8500 RPM
    • Weight: 139kg (dry)
    • Transmission: 5speed
    • Fuel Capacity: 13l
    • Range: 180-250km typical
    • Colours: Black(matte), Red, Yellow, Blue
    Other Points:
    • Tacho added in 2003 revision
    • Sounds bloody fantastic for a 250 with an aftermarket pipe
    HONDA CBF250



    First Released: 2006

    Price when new: $4990.00 + ORC
    Second Hand Value: $3000-$4500 depending on age and condition.


    Specifications:
    • 249cc Air Cooled DOHC 4 valve single
    • Power: 21.45hp (15.7kw) @ 10500 RPM
    • Torque: 22nm (16.2ft.lbs) @ 8500 RPM
    • Weight: 139kg (dry)
    • Transmission: 6speed
    • Fuel Capacity: 16l
    • Range: 250-350km typical
    • Colours: Blue, Black, Silver
    Other Points:
    • Very fuel efficient.
    HONDA CBR125R



    First Released: 2007

    Price when new: $4290.00 + ORC
    Second Hand Value: $3000-$4000 depending on age and condition.


    Specifications:
    • 124.7cc Liquid Cooled SOHC 2 valve single
    • Power: 13hp (9.5kw) @ 10000 RPM
    • Torque: 10.1nm (7.4ft.lbs) @ 8000 RPM
    • Weight: 115kg (dry)
    • Transmission: 6speed
    • Fuel Capacity: 10l
    • Range: 250-350km typical
    • Colours: Blue, Black, White, Red
    Other Points:
    • Most fuel efficient beginners bike
    • Lacks power. Struggles to keep up with 250s on moderate country rides. No you cant make it go faster. Dint say you weren't warned.
    Kawasaki Ninja250 R (aka Skittle)



    First Released: 2008

    Price when new: $6490.00+ ORC
    Second Hand Value: $4700-$6000 depending on age and condition.


    Specifications:
    • 249cc Liquid Cooled 8 valve parallel twin
    • Power: 32hp (23.5kw) @ 11000RPM
    • Torque: 21.7nm (16ft.lbs) @ 10000RPM
    • Weight: 152kg (dry)
    • Transmission: 6speed
    • Fuel Capacity: 18l
    • Range: 250-350km typical
    • Colours: Blue, Black, Green
    Other Points:
    • Newest design of all the 250's
    KAWASAKI GPX250

    First Released 1988 (they only stopped making them this year)

    Price when new: $5990.00+ ORC
    Second Hand Value: $1500-$5000 depending on age and condition.


    Specifications:
    • 249cc Liquid Cooled 8 vavle parallel twin
    • Power: 25hp (19kw) @ 10000RPM
    • Torque: 21.7nm (16ft.lbs) @ 10000RPM
    • Weight: 151kg (dry)
    • Transmission: 6speed
    • Fuel Capacity: 18l
    • Range: 250-350km typical
    • Colours: Black, Red, Blue, and a whole heap of others im sure.
    Other Points:
    • Longest running 250 design in Australia. Only subtle changes were made during the 20 years the bike was on sale.
    KAWASAKI VN250 Eliminator



    First Released: 1999

    Price when new: $8490.00+ ORC
    Second Hand Value: $4000-$7500 depending on age and condition.


    Specifications:
    • 249cc Liquid Cooled DOHC 8 valve V-twin
    • Power: 35hp (26kw) @ 12500RPM
    • Torque: 24nm (17.7ft.lbs) @ 9500RPM
    • Weight: 167kg (dry)
    • Transmission: 6speed
    • Fuel Capacity: 14l
    • Range: 170-250km typical
    • Colours: Black, Silver
    Other Points:
    • Powerful but heavy. Heavier infact that most modern 600cc supersports.
    Hyosung GT250R



    First Released: 2005

    Price when new: $6690.00+ ORC
    Second Hand Value: $3500-$6000 depending on age and condition.


    Specifications:
    • 249cc Air/Oil Cooled DOHC 75deg 8 valve V-twin
    • Power: 27hp (20.13kw) @ 12500RPM
    • Torque: ------------
    • Weight: 168kg (dry)
    • Transmission: 5speed
    • Fuel Capacity: 17l
    • Range: 170-250km typical
    • Colours: Red, Black, Yellow
    Other Points:
    • Largest of the 250 fully faired bikes. Suitable for even the 6' plus lanky buggers.
    • Earlier models suffered from a few reliability issues.
    Hyosung GT250



    First Released: 2002

    Price when new: $5590.00+ ORC
    Second Hand Value: $2500-$5000 depending on age and condition.


    Specifications:
    • 249cc Air/Oil Cooled DOHC 75deg 8 valve V-twin
    • Power: 27hp (20.13kw) @ 12500RPM
    • Torque: ------------
    • Weight: 155kg (dry)
    • Transmission: 5speed
    • Fuel Capacity: 17l
    • Range: 170-250km typical
    • Colours: Red, Black, Yellow, Blue
    Other Points:
    • Largest of the 250 naked bikes. Suitable for even the 6' plus lanky buggers.
    • Earlier models suffered from a few reliability issues.
    Hyosung GV250 Aquilla


    First Released: 2001

    Price when new: $6669.00+ ORC
    Second Hand Value: $2500-$6200 depending on age and condition.


    Specifications:
    • 249cc Air/Oil Cooled DOHC 75deg 8 valve V-twin
    • Power: 27hp (20.13kw) @ 12500RPM
    • Torque: ------------
    • Weight: 155kg (dry)
    • Transmission: 5speed
    • Fuel Capacity: 14l
    • Range: 170-250km typical
    • Colours: Red, Black, Silver, White
    Other Points:
    • Earlier models suffered from a few reliability issues.
    Questions questions questions... im still confused.

    So out of those which should I choose? The best advice I can give you here is go and ride them. If you dont have a licence, go and atleast sit on them. See what feels most comfortable to you. No one else can possibly tell you which bike is right for you.

    Should I buy new or second hand?
    Again the choice is ultimately yours and will usually be dictacted by budget. If you do buy new, expect to loose $1000-$1500 when you sell the bike to upgrade. Buying second hand, you'll likely sell the bike for very little loss and in some cases, get what you paid for it.


    A few things to look out for if buying second hand:
    • First and for most REVS. Always run a revs check on any second hand bike you're considering purchasing regardless of who the seller is. This way, you'll know if its stolen, or has money owing on it.
    • Check for signs the bike has been dropped. Obvious things like scratches on the fairings, foot pegs, bar ends, echaust mirrors etc. Small scratches are nothing to worry about but larger fairing cracks could be costly to repair.
    • Don't buy anything that has dents or cracks in the frame. Strangely enough, Hyosungs do have a factory frame dent that isnt anything to worry about.
    • Check the tyres for cracks, and wear
    • Check the chain for lubrication and slack
    • Check the sprockets for wear
    • Check brakes for wear
    • Check the forks and rear shock. They should be dry with no signs of oil. If you see oil it means the seals are buggered. This is going to throw the handling of the bike right off.
    • Check the levers and controls for freeplay and movement.
    • Make sure all lights, the horn and all switches work.
    • Check the bikes service history
    • Take it for a test ride and check that it doesnt wobble, pull to one side or shake under brakes. It should also roll smoothly into a corner without too much effort. (Under inflated or worn tyres will adversly effect handling). The suspension shouldnt bottom out on bumps or when braking.
    Dont be too upset if your request for a test ride is refused. There have been cases of bikes being stolen on test rides and as a result, some people wont allow it. In this case, have a mechanic check the bike out for you. Also, dont make a stupid offer for the bike unless the buyer is asking a stupid price, this doesnt serve any purpose except to make you look like a donkey.

    Dont worry too much if the tyres, chain and sprockets arent too healthy as these are an easy fix. They could even give you a little more bargaining power with the seller. Electrical problems though? Beware... it may be something as simple as a globe not working. Thats ok if its just the globe but anything else could mean bigger problems like the regulator etc. The last thing you need is your electrics cutting out on dark back streets at night or for the bike to cut out on you as your negotiating a corner.

    Ultimately, if you're not sure either get some who is more knowledgable than yourself to have a look or dont buy it. There's bound to be plenty more bikes to choose from.

    What is my bike going to cost me to service and fix.
    Servicing:
    This is of course going to vary depending on who you take your bike to for servicing and what service you require. You should budget for around $200.00 every 6000km (check your bikes manual for recommend service intervals).

    Tyres:
    Tyres need to be replaced when they're worn or showing signs of cracking in the the groves. Expect to pay around $350-$500.00 for a set of tyres every 10000 to 15000km or 2 to 3 years.

    What type of licence do I need?
    To ride anything from 50 to 250 unsupervised, you require an R-E class licence. For anything above a 250, you're going to need an R class. Unlike some states in the east, you'll have to complete 12 months on your R-E licence before being elegable to sit your test for your open class or R class licence.

    Is it ok to ride without a licence?
    The short answer is no. However, if you have a learners permit for the class of bike you intend to ride, and you're riding with an individual such as an instructor, or with another person who has held that class of licence for atleast 4 years, then yes.

    Other than that dont do it. You're not insured and you could very well wind up with a fine or worst case a court date.

    What is riding out of class?
    Riding out of class is riding a bike for which you're not licenced. IE: Riding a bike between 50 and 250cc on an C or R-N licence, or on your R-E learners permit without an instructor or shadow. The other is of course riding a bike larger than a 250 without an R class licence or without an instructor/shadow (Note: Our licensing system has recently changed so that you no longer require a learners permit for your R class. You're assumed to have it once you've passed your R-E).

    The penalties for riding out of class vary depending on the offence. If you have no learners permit for the class you're caught riding, its essentially a slap on the wrist and a small fine provided you weren't being a hoon. If you're caught riding out of class whilst you hold a learners permit, you're going to court. Have fun with that one.

    I cant afford or dont want to pay for an instructor all the time and have my own bike, whats this shadow business all about?
    A shadow can be any one who has held the class of licence you're trying to gain, for atleast 4 years. There are many members on the forum who offer their time for this purpose. They dont expect payment but it is polite to offer a beer or a burger/kebab . Also, try and spread it around between a few shadows if you can and dont be too greedy. Some suburbs are a little short of shadows so just bare it in mind if people refuse. (Note: It's considered poor form to get your R-E licence, jump straight on an open class bike and expect to be shadowed everywhere.)

    What will my bike cost to insure?
    That depends on your age, the bike, your driving history, where you live, and whether or not you've had any claims in the past. Typically though you'd expect to pay between $500 & $1500.00 to insure a 250. Do yourself and others a favour though. No matter what it costs, please get yourself atleast third party. It's not worth the hassle you cause yourself or others if you cause a stack and you're uninsured.

    What type of insurance is there?
    Three main types. Fully comprehensive, Third party, fire & theft and third party property.

    Fully comprehensive will cost the most because it covers you if you bust your own shit, if you bust someone elses shit, if someone busts or steals your shit.

    Third party fire and theft covers everything covered by third party except for you busting your own shit.

    Third party proporty only covers you for busting someone elses shit.

    What extras should I look for in an insurance policy?
    Most fully comprehensive bike policies offer protection on your gear for little or no extra on your policy. Some offer only $500 worth of cover, others offer upto $4000 and some will only cover your lid(you should replace your lid if you stack). Other extras such as towing, emergency accomodation and hire car may also be offered. Check with your insurnance company as to exactly what extras are included in your policy.

    What about the compulsary third party insurance on my rego? Is that enough?
    No. This doesnt cover any form of property. Its purely there for if you cock up and cause injury to a person whether they be a pillion, another rider, another motorist or a pedestrian.

    I cant afford insurnace, is it still ok to ride?
    As with riding out of class, this subject always stirs emotions and rightly so. Dont do it. Its that simple. If you cant afford insurance you cant afford to ride. If you ride without insurance and you bust your shit, its your problem. But if you ride without insurance and bust someone elses shit? Not cool. You'll cause problems for yourself and problems for the individual who's shit you busted.

    If you choose to ride without insurance and the worst happens, there'll be little sympathy offered by most here.

    SOME IMPORTANT INFO ABOUT INSURANCE:
    Make sure you list any bling, aftermarket parts, additions or alterations you make to your bike on your policy. If you spend thousands on bling and your bike gets busted or nicked without you having done this, your bling isnt covered.
    Also note that you're essentially uninsured if you're riding out of class, under suspention, riding under the influence of drugs or booze, or if your ride is unlicenced or if you've made modifications to your bike your insurance company considers to render your bike not road worthy. If you want a definitive answer as to the conditions underwhich your insurance is null and void, check the PDS (product disclosure statement) your insurance company sent you with your policy. I strongly recommend you read and understand it as you might be a little surprised.

    What gear should I get and how much will it cost?
    You should get atleast a helmet, gloves, jacket, boots and kevlar jeans. Its your choice if you dont but if you come off you'll be wishing you had the gear on.

    Helmet: $200-$1200
    Gloves: $50-$200
    Jacket: $250-$800
    Boots: $100-$400
    Kevlar Jeans: $150-$250

    Now that I have my bike, I want it to go faster, sound better, look better carry more stuff. What can I do?
    Every new rider wants their bike to go faster after a few months. You get use to the power, use to the handling, and want more. Well guess what. Stiff. You can do things like add an aftermarket pipe and rejet the carbies etc but the difference is minimal. Yes you'll notice a small improvement but dont expect miracles. A pipe will make your 250 sound nice though so dont be put off. Something else you can try is changing your sprockets. Less teeth on the front and more on the back. Just like your the old mountain bike/racer thats now gathering dust in the shed, the smaller on the front/bigger on the back, the faster you'll take off. But remember, you also had to pedal faster thus your engine will have to rev higher to maintain a particular speed. (Note: it's not an issue on any 250 that im aware of as the speedo reeds from the front wheel. On bigger bikes where the speedo reads directly from the gear box, a speedo healer is required to re calibrate your speedo)

    As far as looks are concearned theres lots of options. LED indicators, fender eliminators, screens, aftermarket fairings, grips, mirrors just about anything you can think of. The only limits are your imagination and budget. Do give consideration to what you spend though as most only keep a 250 for a year and you wont get your money back on the mods.

    If you want to carry things, as you've no doubt discovered your bike lacks storage, theres alot of options available. Gearsacks which attach to a rack, tank bags which magnetically hold on to your tank, paniers (mainly for cruisers, at this end of the market anyway) and of course backpacks. You'll never carry as much as you can in a car but you'll be able to carry enough gear for a week away. You just need to learn to back only the essentials.

    When Ive done my year on RE's what bike should I get? Is it ok to get a 1000cc?
    You've had a year of dealing with no power, poor brakes, abysmal suspension and hopefully you've learnt a thing or two about bike control and road craft. Now its time to see what bikes are actually all about. By now, you should have an idea of what you want. If you dont, YOUR DOIN IT WRONG!!! Yeah ok, the choice compared to 250's is bloody mind bogling but assuming you havent been a hermit for the last 12 months you've surely been up close and personal with a few fine machines. My advice? Get what ever you want. Remember? No one can tell you what bike's right for you. The same rules apply for upgrading as they did for getting a 250. Anything you jump on is going to go, stop and turn so much better than a 250 you'll really wonder how you did that for 12 months. Just one thing. Be VERY careful with your right wrist.

    Of course its alright to get a 1000cc. Just dont be stupid. Modern 1000cc supersports will get you to the wrong side of 200km/h in a matter of seconds and with only one gear change. What that means is if you play silly buggers and dont know the bike, at the very best, you'll wake up extreamly sore. I dont neet to tell you the worst :mellow:


    Stuff you should know but may not have thought to ask:
    • People who own a bike of a different brand to yours are going to take the piss. Dont cry about it. No one really means it unless you ride a Hyosung (not really applicable these days as the joke got old) or a Pagsta. If you ride a Pagsta you're more of a mechanic than a rider anyway so you wont have to deal with it that often.
    • If you pass a rider comming from the other direction and they nod, return the nod if you see it in time. Or, initiate the nod yourself. Some elitist individuals wont nod, some have stiff necks, others are blind and dont see you. Meh... doesnt matter if they dont. Atleast you cant be accused of being rude.
    • If you see another rider tapping his lid, slow down and stay alert. Theres theres bacon with pineapple ahead. No this is not some mouth watering tropical culinary delight, its the popo, the cops, pigs, fun police, canary patrol etc etc etc.
    • Ride as though everyone else on the road is out to kill you. Dont trust anyone. Dont let your guard down for a second and always know where your exits are.
    • Wheelies, stoppies, burnouts and all that shit have a place and time. That place and time is not a school zone at 8:30 am or Albany Hwy Vic Park at midday on a Saturday. Nor is it on a group ride unless you know those around you and those people are comfortable with your shinanigans.
    • If you're lane splitting/filtering and a faster bike comes up behind you, move over and let them pass.
    • If you split up to an interesection where another bike is already waiting, that bike goes first.
    • Cars WILL pull out on you almost daily. Learn to get over it. There is no point shouting abuse at every idiot that does it to you coz you'd loose your voice pretty bloody quickly. Sure if some one really farks up, then launch into any verbal attack you see fit. Cause damage to a vehicle at your own risk and know that it's classed as criminal damage.
    • If you're no closer to deciding on your bike after all this go here
    • If you have sand in your vagina, ask your mother for 50 cents.
    LINKS & Contacts

    For assistance gaining your licence.
    A guide for those trying to pass their R-E test.
    A list of motorcycle instuctors in Perth (Updated regularly)
    Available shadows for learner riders
    DPI: Getting a motocycle licence
    DPI: Motocycle licence theory test PDF
    DPI: Online road rules theory test
    DPI: Your practical assesment

    Where to find a bike:
    Online....
    PSB of course
    Bikesales
    Bikepoint
    Trading Post

    SOR Shops
    Five Star Yamaha
    54-58 Rockingham Road
    Hamilton Hill WA 6163
    Phone: (08) 9430 4090
    Fax: (08) 9430 6212
    enquiries@fivestaryamaha.com.au
    sales@fivestaryamaha.com.au

    Prestige Honda
    36 McCoy Street
    Melville WA 6156
    Phone: (08) 9317 5777
    Fax: (08) 9317 4600
    sales@prestigemotorcycles.com.au

    McCulloch Suzuki
    577 Albany Highway
    Vic Park WA 6100
    Phone: (08) 9361 5504
    Fax: (08) 9362 6610
    Mcculloch3@bigpond.com

    Causeway Kawasaki
    Unit 1, 115 Albany Highway
    Victoria Park WA 6100
    Phone: (08) 9362 3266
    Fax: (08) 9472 1206
    info@causewaykawasaki.com.au

    Causeway Yamaha
    Address Unit 4 / 115 Albany Hwy
    Victoria Park WA 6100
    Phone: (08) 9361 8244
    Fax: (08) 9470 1206

    Causeway Honda
    101 Albany Highway and
    Unit 3/115 Albany Highway
    VICTORIA PARK WA 6100
    Phone: 08 93616677
    Fax: 08 93616788
    sales@causewayhonda.com.au

    Dale Britton Motorcycles
    Unit 5/115 Albany Hwy
    Victoria Park, WA, 6100
    Phone: 08 9470 1234
    Fax: 08 9470 5628

    Rockingham

    Witch Cycles Suzuki
    109 Day Road
    Rockingham WA 6168
    Phone: (08) 9527 2398
    Fax: (08) 9527 7477

    Kim Britton Kawasaki
    91 Dixon Road
    ROCKINGHAM WA 6169
    Phone: (08) 9592 1113
    Fax: (08) 9528 1393

    Midland

    Mach1 Motorcycles Kawasaki
    237 GREAT EASTERN HWY
    MIDLAND, WA 6056
    Phone: (08) 9250-2522
    Fax: (08) 9274-6607
    enquiries@mach1.com.au

    Savage Suzuki
    15 Victoria Street
    Midland WA 6056
    Phone: (08) 9274 4866
    Fax: (08) 9274 2984
    sales@savagsuzuki.com.au

    Highway Yamaha
    31 Victoria St
    Midland WA 6056
    Phone: (08) 9274 6744
    Fax: (08) 9274 3640

    The Honda Shop
    106 Morrison Road
    Midland WA 6056
    Phone: (08) 9274 3555
    Fax: (08) 9274 1978

    NOR

    Llyod Chapman Suzuki/Triumph
    266 Lord Street Perth
    Western Australia 6000.
    Phone: (08) 9328 3400
    Fax: (08) 9227 6251

    Rick Gill Motorcycles Honda
    13 Main Street
    Osbourne Park, WA 6017
    Phone: (08) 9443 3555
    Fax: (08) 9242 1874
    rickgill@iinet.net.au

    Insurance Companies:
    QBE
    RAC
    Swann
    eBike
    Shannons Note: Shannons wont insure you unless you keep your bike in a locked garage or shed.
    Insure My Ride
    AAMI


    Please bare with me people. (i know theres a couple more shops its late and im off to sleep. ) This is a work in progress and will be subject to change for a little while yet. Please let me know if you see anything misleading and I'll ammend it accordingly.

    Cheers
    In complete darkness we are all the same. It is only our knowledge and wisdom that seperate us. Dont let your eyes deceive you.
    Its the little things that make the difference
    Quote Originally Posted by IPIT on relationships
    If either/both of you can take a dump with the other person being next to you within a week of meeting them then you're in with a VERY good chance.
    Likes Kia, Bunyack liked this post

  2. #2
    Member =Stevo='s Avatar
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    CBR250 is a 6 speed, innit?

    good writeup

    Other bikes to add:

    Kwaka Balius
    the REAL kwaka ninja (zx2r)
    Kwaka ZZR
    Suzuki Across
    Suzuki Bandit
    Yamaha FZR250
    Yamaha Zeal
    Yamaha Virago
    Honda VT250
    Honda CB250

    also perhaps instead of seperating them into manufacturer you could seperate the bikes into:
    Fully faired
    Naked
    Cruiser

    as most people will already have their heart set on a certain style, so it would probably be more useful to be able to easily see all of the options in the category...

    once again, good work

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    Very good idea mate....

    My thoughts are to ADD the following.

    1.Insurance comapnies names and contact numbers.
    2.Bikeshops where they can purchise gear get bikes serviced
    3.Mobile mechanics contact details
    4.mention something about 2 strokes
    5.What happens if you get caught out of class
    6.Explain the whole shadow process
    7.maybe something about behaiving PSB like dont join up to tell us that you think we are knobs

    I reccon it would be best if it was one big post.

    Once again very good incitive. I will put it part of my sig once its all done.

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    Okay. And riding without shadow while on R-E learners permit? I assume it results in a court summons for driving without a license. Would you lose all your other classes e.g HR. Would you then have to re-sit the practical assessment to gain your other class license back?

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    Member thro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    Okay. And riding without shadow while on R-E learners permit? I assume it results in a court summons for driving without a license. Would you lose all your other classes e.g HR. Would you then have to re-sit the practical assessment to gain your other class license back?


    Penalties change.

    Let it just be said that "it's bad" and "with the current police presence targeting fenders and bikes in general, you WILL get picked up" - if you're going to ride out of class or contravene your learners permit, don't believe shit posted on a forum, go check the penalties out for yourself before hand so you know what you're putting on the line.

    Also, see the PSB FAQ.
    “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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    if ya want the best 250 with good cheap modding yeah go for what every1 in aust has ridden a cbr250rr, personally oldoldold and every1 has had 1. not me cause ive never liked them. the 2stroke ninjas will give you a good ride. i brought the 2008 ninja and worked it cause i wanted the best 250 on the market done up, so when i jumped onto my big bike i know what too expect with the huge power differences. plus i aint one to sit on a shitter. i did just sell her for $8k with all the mods and a joe rocket textile jacket and a joe rocket leather 1 piece racesuit. whatever yous all do dont even look at the cbr125, scooters for ladies, my bmx back tyre no bullshit is bigger. you aint gonna be able to lean over and learn how to ride, and street cred, what street cred, you would be better off buying a 2stroke 125cc aprillia. now theres a nice starting bike.

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    Member Rider's Avatar
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    This is coming along very nicly mate. BUT i dont see an Across on there yet

  8. #8
    Member thro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Motz82 View Post
    if ya want the best 250 with good cheap modding yeah go for what every1 in aust has ridden a cbr250rr, personally oldoldold and every1 has had 1. not me cause ive never liked them. the 2stroke ninjas will give you a good ride. i brought the 2008 ninja and worked it cause i wanted the best 250 on the market done up, so when i jumped onto my big bike i know what too expect with the huge power differences.

    um..

    what?

    ninja 250 -> any bike bigger than 250cc is about as big a jump as going from a skateboard to a car - just the same as any other 250...



    agreed on the RS125 being a top bike, but the CBR125 is fine for someone who wants something light, reliable, economical and fuel injected....


    no, they're not quick in a straight line on freeways, but no 250 is either...
    “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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    Giving Honda CBF250 a top mention. Mum has one and is the easiest bike to ride. Fairly cheap and great turning circle!

  10. #10
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    ^^^ Good to do your test on, but there's no way I could stand a year of riding on that unfaired sewing machine.

    no, they're not quick in a straight line on freeways, but no 250 is either...
    The difference is that 250s can go fast enough in a straight line for instant loss of licence on the freeway. The CBR125 can't.

  11. #11
    Member thro's Avatar
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    ^^ because of course that is of primary importance when on your RE or RE Ls.

    “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

  12. #12
    Member Kryzaach's Avatar
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    Nice work Aphid, fark that must have taken a while to write up... Have you stuck this in the Wiki?
    "In all the human societies we have ever reviewed, in every age and in every state, there has seldom if ever been a shortage of eager young males prepared to kill and die to preserve the security, comfort and prejudices of their elders, and what you call heroism is just an expression of this fact; there is never a scarcity of idiots." -The Culture

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    Member Cone Cat's Avatar
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    Nice write up!

    Quote Originally Posted by Aphex View Post
    What will my bike cost to insure?
    That depends on your age, the bike, your driving history, where you live, and whether or not you've had any claims in the past. Typically though you'd expect to pay between $500 & $1500.00 to insure a 250. Do yourself and others a favour though. No matter what it costs, please get yourself atleast third party. It's not worth the hassle you cause yourself or others if you cause a stack and you're uninsured.
    A little nit pick, but $500 PA insurance on a 250 is not the lower end, not unless the $178.00 I was charged was for 4 months insurance...

    Also, the guide would benefit with some reviews written by owners of each bike both new and second hand. I'm sure we have plenty of owners of each bike on this site!

    Just some food for thought either way.

  14. #14
    Member thro's Avatar
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    ^^ its certainly not the high end.

    quote for my zzr was 770/pa - for a 29yo rider.

    pretty clean record, but new bike and swann insurance (rip off).
    “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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    what a great thread!!! Its opened my eyes to a few things i wasnt aware of!
    RIP ADRIAN LEE
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    Nice work! although, I'm not sure how accurate the data on these bikes is. The range for a stock GT250R for mixed city/freeway riding is about 400-450kms per tank.

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    the entire section of:

    "Stuff you should know but may not have thought to ask:"

    is the best part of this post. i wouldn't of had a clue of any of these common motorcyclist etiquettes.

    thanks so much for your time and effort on educating us newbies. im doing a lot of research and hope to get riding a 250 soon. best forum to get information so far

  18. #18
    Member jak47's Avatar
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    damm good... its really good having all the links in one place.. Accesory shops though, like the helmetshop or whatever it is?
    Great work
    She's not hot enough to be a cougar...

  19. #19
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    im selling my ninja 250r
    its in the for sale section if you want to look at it

  20. #20
    Member edd's Avatar
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    great write up, it has been really helpful.

    so ive only just got R-E license and i got an as new 07 Hyo gt250r for cheap but its giving me really sore wrists after not much time on the bike. is it something to do with poor riding position or do you get used to it soon enough?

    cheers
    ed

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